bz.acetonemagazine.org
New recipes

Yellow Split Pea Soup With Toasted Pecans

Yellow Split Pea Soup With Toasted Pecans



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Tofu gives this soup a smooth and silky texture

Recipe Courtesy of Nasoya

Made with Nasoya Silken Tofu, this recipe for split pea soup is creamy without the dairy, making for a hearty and healthy lunch or dinner.

Notes

*To toast pecans, heat oven to 350°F. Spread pecans in ungreased shallow pan. Bake uncovered 6 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until light brown.

Ingredients

For the Soup

  • 1 Package silken tofu, such as Nasoya Organic Silken Tofu, drained
  • 1/2 Cup shallots, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon fresh ginger, chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 8 Cups water
  • 3 Cups butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cubed
  • 2 Cups dried yellow split peas
  • 2 Teaspoons thyme
  • 2 Teaspoons salt
  • 1 Teaspoon ground mustard
  • 1/2 Teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 Cup chopped pecans, toasted

11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).


11 Simple and Scrumptious Split Pea Recipes

Just like Brussels sprouts, lima beans and beets, split peas are a healthy diet staple most of us learned to love only during adulthood. While they're often the star of a hearty soup, split peas are versatile enough to include in a variety of different recipes.

Here's why you should stock up on these peas: A half-cup serving of cooked split peas boasts 116 calories, 0 grams fat, 21 grams carbohydrates, 8 grams fiber and 8 grams of protein. It's also a source of iron (providing 7 percent of your Daily Value), potassium (8 percent DV), magnesium (8 percent DV) and zinc (9 percent DV).

Split peas are part of the pulse family along with various types of beans, chickpeas and lentils. Pulses have a wide range of health benefits including supporting heart health by lowering cholesterol levels and acting as a prebiotic fiber (food for the good bacteria in our guts), according to USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council.

Because pulses are made up of complex carbs, they provide sustained energy without post-meal crashes. And while many people avoid carbs to help manage their weight, split peas are perfectly set up to help support weight-management goals — thanks in part to their combination of protein and fiber.

Are You Getting Enough Protein?

Track your macros by logging your meals on the MyPlate app. Download now to fine-tune your diet today!

They even do good by the environment. Split peas are what's called a nitrogen-fixing crop, per the USA Dry Pea & Lentil Council. That means they grab nitrogen from the air and turn it into an available nutrient, which, in turn, reduces the need for nitrogen fertilizers. They're also very inexpensive at about

2. Split Pea Hummus

Move over chickpeas — split peas are the star of this hummus (which, of course, contains tahini, too). "Tahini is rich in phosphorus and manganese, which are critical in maintaining healthy bones," Amanda Nicole, RDN, says. "Tahini is also high in antioxidants called lignans that can protect our body from oxidative stress."

Get the Split Pea Hummus recipe and nutrition info from Yum Vegan Food.

.10 per serving.

If you're not a split-pea-soup enthusiast, or if you're just looking for more ways to enjoy this loveable pulse, we've pulled together six split pea recipes you haven't tried yet (but should, stat!).