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Portuguese Egg Custard Tarts

Portuguese Egg Custard Tarts



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Part of the joy of eating these tarts comes from the contrast of the crunchy crust with the soft custardy filling. Making the custard is easy; the crust is more of a commitment involving rolling, buttering, folding, and repeating. If you want a shortcut, start with store-bought puff pastry, roll out to a 12" square about ⅛" thick, roll into a tightly spiraled log, and follow the instructions for slicing and pressing into the muffin tin cups. And you can read more about the globe-spanning history of Portuguese egg tarts here.

Ingredients

Dough

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • ½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened

Filling and Assembly

  • 1 3–4-inch cinnamon stick
  • 1½ cups whole milk, divided
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Recipe Preparation

Dough

  • Using your hands, mix salt, 1 cup flour, and ½ cup water in a large bowl until a shaggy dough forms. Knead until dough is elastic but still very sticky, about 5 minutes (alternatively, beat on medium speed in a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment until dough pulls away from sides of bowl, about 3 minutes). Wrap in plastic and let sit 30 minutes to relax gluten.

  • Make sure your butter is softened to the consistency of sour cream (you can put it in a bowl and give it a stir). Generously flour (really, use a lot of flour) a clean work surface. Place dough on surface and dust with flour; lightly coat rolling pin with flour. Roll dough out to a 12" square (it will be quite thin), flouring surface as needed to prevent dough from sticking.

  • Brush excess flour off dough. Imagine dough is made up of 3 equal columns. Using a small rubber spatula, spread 2½ Tbsp. butter over the left and center columns, leaving a ½" border around the edges (it should look like a slice of toast that’s been buttered on the left two-thirds). Lift up the right, unbuttered column and fold it over the middle column, then fold the far left column over the middle, as though you were folding a letter into thirds. Rotate dough 90° counterclockwise; the sides and top edge will be open.

  • Generously flour work surface and dough. Roll out again to a 12" square. Repeat buttering and folding process. Again rotate folded dough 90° counterclockwise, flouring surface as needed. Roll dough out a third time to a 12" square (it’s worth it; we promise!). Spread remaining butter over surface of dough, leaving a ½" border. Starting with the long side closest to you, tease up edge of dough with a bench scraper and tightly roll it away from you into a log, brushing excess flour from the underside as you go. This dough is very forgiving—if there are any small holes, don't worry about it. When you get to the end, wet edge of dough just before you roll it so that it sticks. Trim both ends to clean up the edges, cut log in half crosswise, then wrap both pieces in plastic wrap (you should have two 6" logs). Chill 1 log at least 3 hours; transfer remaining log to freezer for another use (this amount of dough makes enough for 24 tarts; freeze the extras for your future crispy tart needs).

  • Do Ahead: Dough can be made 1 day ahead; keep chilled, or freeze up to 3 months.

Filling and Assembly

  • Peel zest from one half of lemon into wide strips with a vegetable peeler, leaving white pith behind; set aside. Bring cinnamon, sugar, and ¼ cup water to a boil in a small saucepan fitted with candy thermometer over medium-high heat. Cook, swirling pan occasionally, until thermometer registers 225°. Remove from heat and stir in reserved lemon peel. Let sugar syrup sit 30 minutes.

  • Position a rack in top third of oven; preheat to 500°. Place a rimmed baking sheet in oven to heat.

  • Whisk flour, salt, and ½ cup milk in a medium bowl until combined and no lumps remain. Heat remaining 1 cup milk in a large saucepan over medium-high until it begins to boil, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk into flour mixture. Return mixture to saucepan over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until thick, creamy, and smooth, about 5 minutes.

  • Strain sugar syrup through a fine-mesh sieve into hot milk mixture and whisk to combine. Whisk in egg yolks and vanilla.

  • Cut chilled dough crosswise into twelve ½"-thick slices. Place 8 slices on a plate and chill; place remaining 4 dough slices in 4 cups of a standard 12-cup muffin pan. Using your thumb, firmly press the center each piece against bottom of cup, forming a wall of dough around your thumb. Using your thumbs and fingers, press edges of dough against sides of cup, turning pan as you go, until dough comes halfway up sides of cup and is about 1/16" thick (or as thin as you can get it). Repeat twice more with remaining dough slices.

  • Fill each pastry shell with about 2 Tbsp. filling (it should come about three-fourths of the way up the sides). Try not to get any on the pan itself; it may burn and stick during baking.

  • Carefully place muffin pan on heated baking sheet in oven and bake tarts until custard is slightly puffed and browned in spots, and crust is golden brown and bubbles of melted butter are popping around it, 14–16 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes in pan, then carefully transfer each tart to a wire rack with an offset spatula. Let cool 20 minutes before serving.

Reviews SectionWas quite confused how I the puff pastry makes 24, but the filling only makes 12... Also, thrown off by how I was suppose to use only half of the puff pastry, but ended up needing more than the halfAnonymousVancouver05/31/20Turned out delicious!! I dusted mine with a little cinnamon and powdered sugar. Followed the recipe exactly as is and got 24, not 12.tay12345643New York04/26/20I cut the pastry roll into 1 inch thickness instead of 1/2 inch (so got 12 instead of 24). I am not sure how 1/2 inch would work--seems like the tart crust would be too thin. Worked out great.AnonymousEast Greenwich, RI04/24/20To my delight, this recipe was much easier than it looks. The tarts came out absolutely delicious, and just how I remember from Portugal--flaky, buttery and with a delicious custard. Surprisingly, the dough was not hard to work with at all, the hardest part was pressing it into the muffin tin--but I had frozen the log instead of refrigerating it (so as to not have to wait so long) so I am sure that contributed. The sugar syrup did re-crystallize as it cooled even though I added lemon juice as some reviewers said, but I just reheated it a bit again to melt the crystals and that worked fine. Would love to do again in the future.AnonymousEast Greenwich, RI04/24/20Turned out pretty good. I opted for my favorite puff pastry recipe, which I blind baked before adding the custard. To prevent crystalization, I suggest NOT swirling the pan, and keeping the temp at medium while bringing syrup to 225deg. Also, I thought the custard a bit thin, and lacking in flavor from the cinn. and lemon zest; so, I returned the cinn. stick and zest to the custard, and carefully continued cooking on and off the flame, whisking vigorously, for another 10mins or so. Faint influence was wonderful!!AnonymousCalifornia04/22/20Super yummy! When you add the flour milk mixture into the pan, make sure to really stir it the whole time or it can get a bit chunky. My syrup didn't crystalize but I mixed the sugar and water beforehand and then tried to stir it just a little while it was in the pan. The dough is a bit of a pain, but nice to have some extra puff pastry around for later!Ditto the comments below. Confusing amounts of tartlets vs. custard. And, my first try at the sugar syrup failed due to crystallization. I followed the suggestion in comments and the second try worked. It's a delicious treat!AnonymousSomerville, MA01/21/20AMAZING!!!This recipe is extremely delicious. These fresh, homemade Portuguese custard tarts are incredible. I'm lost for words.The pastry is crispy and flakey, a glorious crunch as you take a bite, the custard melts in your mouth with a lemony, vanilla aroma.There is some confusion about the quantities of custard and pastry. as it said that the pastry made 24 tarts, and did not repeat this for the custard, I assumed that the custard made 12 tarts and doubled the custard recipe! Although the custard is delicious and I am happy to make more tarts in the future, it would be good if this recipe stated throughout that it made 24 OR 12 consistently.AnonymousCambridgeshire05/22/19Love this recipe! The dough was quite wet to start with and I wondered if I had converted the recipe wrong (cups > grams), but once I kneaded it came together nicely. The first time I made them the sugar syrup crystalized, but I saw the review below and the second time I brought it up to about 200 degrees and then added some lemon juice and it worked great.This could be because I didn't use a candy thermometer, but the first time I made the syrup, it totally crystallized. I found another recipe, though, that says you should cook the syrup until it boils, let it go for one minute, and then remove from heat. Then, I took half a lemon, stirred some of its juice into the syrup, and then put the lemon half in there until I was ready to use it. It worked perfectly! Also, I would suggest rotating the tarts halfway through baking to make sure all of them get a nice char on top.

Ku terima

Portuguese Egg Dessert : Original Portuguese Custard Egg Tart Recipe (Pastéis de . / Recipe adapted from 'my portugal:. Today i've come up with a list of 20 famous portuguese desserts. This post may contain affiliate links, which eggs, especially the yolks, feature heavily. Portuguese, pies and tarts, egg, milk, puff pastry, dessert, easter. Ada pengaturan api atas & bawah. It does use a whopping 15 egg yolks.

Make it at home today. Homemade yummy portuguese egg tart with egg tart wrapper recipe and custard filling recipe. The egg whites were used to starch clothes and preserve. Encharcada is a portuguese dessert consisting of beaten egg yolks cooked in a sugar syrup lightly overall, this is an easy dessert to make with only 4 ingredients. This post may contain affiliate links, which eggs, especially the yolks, feature heavily.

Portuguese Dessert Egg Tart (Pasteis De Nata) In Man S . from thumbs.dreamstime.com Aletria recipe, portuguese aletria, portuguese angel hair past dessert, sweet angel hair pasta. Recipe adapted from 'my portugal: Golden crisp tart crust, fragrant and creamy custard filling. This is definitely one of portugal's most unusual desserts: It does use a whopping 15 egg yolks. I used 1/4 cup of sugar and the filling was quite sweet enough. Homemade yummy portuguese egg tart with egg tart wrapper recipe and custard filling recipe. When it comes to portuguese desserts, the egg is king—something that would be plainly obvious to anyone passing the piles of yellow heaped in every bakery's window:

Today i've come up with a list of 20 famous portuguese desserts.

Encharcada is a portuguese dessert consisting of beaten egg yolks cooked in a sugar syrup lightly overall, this is an easy dessert to make with only 4 ingredients. Recipe adapted from 'my portugal: This portuguese rice pudding is made with milk, sugar, rice, citrus zest, cinnamon, eggs, and light cream, and is garnished. Egg tarts are often served at dim sum restaurants and cha chaan tengs. Sericaia, or portuguese egg pudding is a dish that hails from portugal's alentejo region. For the egg tart wrappers, i would love to make a larger batch since the process is time consuming. This is definitely one of portugal's most unusual desserts: Portuguese cakes and desserts you really should try. A soft, spongy and very delicate texture. It's molotof, portuguese egg whites pudding. You mean dessert recipes for diabetic people right? Homemade yummy portuguese egg tart with egg tart wrapper recipe and custard filling recipe. The egg tart is a kind of custard tart found in cantonese cuisine derived from the english custard tart and portuguese pastel de nata.

Encharcada is a portuguese dessert consisting of beaten egg yolks cooked in a sugar syrup lightly overall, this is an easy dessert to make with only 4 ingredients. Nuns from the convents of elvas and vila viçosa both claim to be the creators of the dessert, but the most traditional version of. Ada pengaturan api atas & bawah. Imagine baking portuguese egg tarts for the first time for a portuguese. Knows portuguese, but its one of my favourite dinners ever!

Portuguese Egg Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nada) 葡撻 | Chérie . from 4.bp.blogspot.com This dessert well exemplifies portuguese dessert making and cuisine in general, simple to make but always wonderfully delicious. Whisking constantly, add hot milk mixture to eggs in a slow stream until fully incorporated. This recipe is a hybrid of hong kong (dim sum) and portuguese egg tarts to get the best attributes of both styles. Make it at home today. Bisa memanggang dengan panas merata. Homemade yummy portuguese egg tart with egg tart wrapper recipe and custard filling recipe. Imagine baking portuguese egg tarts for the first time for a portuguese. Portuguese cakes and desserts you really should try.

I used 1/4 cup of sugar and the filling was quite sweet enough.

The egg tart is a kind of custard tart found in cantonese cuisine derived from the english custard tart and portuguese pastel de nata. The dish consists of an outer pastry crust filled with egg custard. Aletria, is a sweet dessert made with fine egg noddles which is mostly served at christmas and for. It does use a whopping 15 egg yolks. A soft, spongy and very delicate texture. Make it at home today. It's molotof, portuguese egg whites pudding. This recipe is a hybrid of hong kong (dim sum) and portuguese egg tarts to get the best attributes of both styles. Egg tarts are often served at dim sum restaurants and cha chaan tengs. Nuns from the convents of elvas and vila viçosa both claim to be the creators of the dessert, but the most traditional version of. Golden crisp tart crust, fragrant and creamy custard filling. Encharcada is a portuguese dessert consisting of beaten egg yolks cooked in a sugar syrup lightly overall, this is an easy dessert to make with only 4 ingredients. Portuguese egg tarts (pastéis de nata).

For the egg tart wrappers, i would love to make a larger batch since the process is time consuming. Portuguese, pies and tarts, egg, milk, puff pastry, dessert, easter. Recipes and stories,' by george mendes (stewart, tabori & chang). Portuguese egg tarts are only be made of puff pastry. Portuguese cakes and desserts you really should try.

Egg Tart, Traditional Portuguese Dessert, Pastel De Nata . from thumbs.dreamstime.com Make it at home today. Today i've come up with a list of 20 famous portuguese desserts. When it comes to portuguese desserts, the egg is king—something that would be plainly obvious to anyone passing the piles of yellow heaped in every bakery's window: A soft, spongy and very delicate texture. Recipe adapted from 'my portugal: Make it at home today. Egg tarts are often served at dim sum restaurants and cha chaan tengs. Bisa memanggang dengan panas merata.

6 eggs split into yolks and whites 3 cups of milk 3/4 cups of.

Sericaia, or portuguese egg pudding is a dish that hails from portugal's alentejo region. Aletria recipe, portuguese aletria, portuguese angel hair past dessert, sweet angel hair pasta. 6 eggs split into yolks and whites 3 cups of milk 3/4 cups of. Imagine baking portuguese egg tarts for the first time for a portuguese. When it comes to portuguese desserts, the egg is king—something that would be plainly obvious to anyone passing the piles of yellow heaped in every bakery's window: Today i've come up with a list of 20 famous portuguese desserts. Portuguese egg tarts (pastéis de nata). Portuguese egg tart portuguese desserts portuguese recipes creme brulee flan egg made so many portuguese egg tarts in my university days after i fell in love with them in portugal in 2001! The egg whites were used to starch clothes and preserve. Portuguese egg tarts (pastéis de nata). Make it at home today. I used 1/4 cup of sugar and the filling was quite sweet enough. For the egg tart wrappers, i would love to make a larger batch since the process is time consuming.

Whisking constantly, add hot milk mixture to eggs in a slow stream until fully incorporated. Nuns from the convents of elvas and vila viçosa both claim to be the creators of the dessert, but the most traditional version of. Aletria, is a sweet dessert made with fine egg noddles which is mostly served at christmas and for. Ada pengaturan api atas & bawah. This portuguese rice pudding is made with milk, sugar, rice, citrus zest, cinnamon, eggs, and light cream, and is garnished.

Source: easyportugueserecipes.com

If anyone knows what it's called or has its very close to that dish, just the stake cut up with a sauce on top and without the egg, i always have. Whisking constantly, add hot milk mixture to eggs in a slow stream until fully incorporated. I used 1/4 cup of sugar and the filling was quite sweet enough. Nuns from the convents of elvas and vila viçosa both claim to be the creators of the dessert, but the most traditional version of. A soft, spongy and very delicate texture.

Source: cdn.theculturetrip.com

I used 1/4 cup of sugar and the filling was quite sweet enough. The dish consists of an outer pastry crust filled with egg custard. A soft, spongy and very delicate texture. When it comes to portuguese desserts, the egg is king—something that would be plainly obvious to anyone passing the piles of yellow heaped in every bakery's window: 6 eggs split into yolks and whites 3 cups of milk 3/4 cups of.

Recipes and stories,' by george mendes (stewart, tabori & chang). Egg tarts are often served at dim sum restaurants and cha chaan tengs. A soft, spongy and very delicate texture. It's a dessert made with egg yolks and sugar. Whisking constantly, add hot milk mixture to eggs in a slow stream until fully incorporated.

This recipe is a hybrid of hong kong (dim sum) and portuguese egg tarts to get the best attributes of both styles. Recipes and stories,' by george mendes (stewart, tabori & chang). Golden crisp tart crust, fragrant and creamy custard filling. Aletria, is a sweet dessert made with fine egg noddles which is mostly served at christmas and for. Place the yolks in a large bowl.

Source: ssl.bigstockimages.com

Homemade yummy portuguese egg tart with egg tart wrapper recipe and custard filling recipe. Portuguese egg tarts are only be made of puff pastry. Recipe adapted from 'my portugal: Knows portuguese, but its one of my favourite dinners ever! Portuguese egg tarts (pastéis de nata).

This dessert well exemplifies portuguese dessert making and cuisine in general, simple to make but always wonderfully delicious. Aletria recipe, portuguese aletria, portuguese angel hair past dessert, sweet angel hair pasta. Nuns from the convents of elvas and vila viçosa both claim to be the creators of the dessert, but the most traditional version of. The best portuguese desserts recipes on yummly | portuguese pavlova, portuguese egg pudding, sericaia, or portuguese egg pudding. When it comes to portuguese desserts, the egg is king—something that would be plainly obvious to anyone passing the piles of yellow heaped in every bakery's window:

Bisa memanggang dengan panas merata. Make it at home today. I used 1/4 cup of sugar and the filling was quite sweet enough. You mean dessert recipes for diabetic people right? Today i've come up with a list of 20 famous portuguese desserts.

Source: thumbs.dreamstime.com

Bisa memanggang dengan panas merata. 6 eggs split into yolks and whites 3 cups of milk 3/4 cups of. I used 1/4 cup of sugar and the filling was quite sweet enough. It's a dessert made with egg yolks and sugar. Portuguese, pies and tarts, egg, milk, puff pastry, dessert, easter.

The best portuguese desserts recipes on yummly | portuguese pavlova, portuguese egg pudding, sericaia, or portuguese egg pudding.

6 eggs split into yolks and whites 3 cups of milk 3/4 cups of.

6 eggs split into yolks and whites 3 cups of milk 3/4 cups of.

Portuguese egg tarts (pastéis de nata).

Source: thumbs.dreamstime.com

Portuguese egg tarts are only be made of puff pastry.

The egg tart is a kind of custard tart found in cantonese cuisine derived from the english custard tart and portuguese pastel de nata.

The dish consists of an outer pastry crust filled with egg custard.

This post may contain affiliate links, which eggs, especially the yolks, feature heavily.

Whisking constantly, add hot milk mixture to eggs in a slow stream until fully incorporated.

The egg whites were used to starch clothes and preserve.

Today i've come up with a list of 20 famous portuguese desserts.

Source: thumbs.dreamstime.com

Recipe adapted from 'my portugal:

Source: thumbs.dreamstime.com

Portuguese, pies and tarts, egg, milk, puff pastry, dessert, easter.

Place the yolks in a large bowl.

Whisking constantly, add hot milk mixture to eggs in a slow stream until fully incorporated.

Aletria recipe, portuguese aletria, portuguese angel hair past dessert, sweet angel hair pasta.

When it comes to portuguese desserts, the egg is king—something that would be plainly obvious to anyone passing the piles of yellow heaped in every bakery's window:

The egg tart is a kind of custard tart found in cantonese cuisine derived from the english custard tart and portuguese pastel de nata.

Source: thumbs.dreamstime.com

This dessert well exemplifies portuguese dessert making and cuisine in general, simple to make but always wonderfully delicious.

Aletria, is a sweet dessert made with fine egg noddles which is mostly served at christmas and for.

Aletria recipe, portuguese aletria, portuguese angel hair past dessert, sweet angel hair pasta.

Source: thumbs.dreamstime.com

See more ideas about desserts, portuguese recipes, portuguese desserts.

Put two thawed pastries together, one on top of the other and.


1. Portuguese Tomato Rice

Tomato rice is a staple in Portuguese households, but it is most popular in the South-Central areas of the country where fresh tomatoes are abundant.

The dish is not just a simple combination of rice and tomatoes, though.

Rather, it&rsquos a medley of flavorful and aromatic ingredients, from sauteed onions and garlic to bacon and broth.

Together with the rice and tomatoes, it&rsquos a hearty, savory, and refreshing entree that tastes well with sausage, chicken, or pork.


Pastéis de Nata | Portuguese Custard Tarts

  • Quick Glance
  • (110)
  • 1 H
  • 2 H, 30 M
  • Makes 40 pastries

Special Equipment: Mini-muffin tin with 2-by-5/8-inch (50-by-15-mm) wells If you prefer the classic larger tins from Portugal, you can purchase them at Portugalia Marketplace.

Ingredients US Metric

  • For the pasteis de nata dough
  • 2 cups minus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, plus more for the work surface
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons cold water
  • 2 sticks (8 oz) unsalted butter, room temperature, stirred until smooth
  • For the custard
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/4 cups milk, divided
  • 1 1/3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2/3 cup water
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 6 large egg yolks, whisked
  • For the garnish
  • Confectioners' sugar
  • Cinnamon

Directions

In a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, mix the flour, salt, and water until a soft, pillowy dough forms that pulls away from the side of the bowl, about 30 seconds.

Generously flour a work surface and pat the dough into a 6-inch (15-cm) square using a pastry scraper. Flour the dough, cover with plastic wrap, and let it rest at room temperature for 15 minutes.

Roll the dough into an 18-inch (46-cm) square. As you work, use the scraper to lift the dough to make sure the underside isn’t sticking to your work surface.

Brush the excess flour off the top of the dough, trim any uneven edges, and, using a small offset spatula, dot and then spread the left 2/3 portion of the dough with a little less than 1/3 of the butter being careful to leave a 1 inch (25 mm) plain border around the edge of the dough.

Neatly fold the unbuttered right 1/3 of the dough (using the pastry scraper to loosen it if it sticks) over the rest of the dough. Brush off any excess flour, then fold over the left 1/3 of the dough. Starting from the top, pat down the dough with your hand to release any air bubbles, and then pinch the edges of the dough to seal. Brush off any excess flour.

Turn the dough 90° to the left so the fold is facing you. Lift the dough and flour the work surface. Once again roll it out to an 18-inch (46-cm) square, then dot the left 2/3 of the dough with 1/3 of the butter and smear it over the dough. Fold the dough as directed in steps 4 and 5.

For the last rolling, turn the dough 90° to the left and roll out the dough to an 18-by-21-inch (46-by-53-cm) rectangle, with the shorter side facing you. Spread the remaining butter over the entire surface of the dough.

Using the spatula as an aid, lift the edge of dough closest to you and roll the dough away from you into a tight log, brushing the excess flour from the underside as you go. Trim the ends and cut the log in half. Wrap each piece in plastic wrap and chill for 2 hours or preferably overnight. (The pastry can be frozen for up to 3 months.)

In a medium bowl, whisk the flour and 1/4 cup milk (60 ml) until smooth.

Bring the sugar, cinnamon, and water to a boil in a small saucepan and cook until an instant-read thermometer registers 220°F (104°C). Do not stir.

Meanwhile, in another small saucepan, scald the remaining 1 cup milk (237 ml). Whisk the hot milk into the flour mixture.

Remove the cinnamon stick and then pour the sugar syrup in a thin stream into the hot milk-and-flour mixture, whisking briskly. Add the vanilla and stir for a minute until very warm but not hot. Whisk in the yolks, strain the mixture into a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside. The custard will be thin that is as it should be. (You can refrigerate the custard for up to 3 days.)

Place an oven rack in the top third position and heat the oven to 550°F (290°C). Remove a pastry log from the refrigerator and roll it back and forth on a lightly floured surface until it’s about an inch (25 mm) in diameter and 16 inches (41 cm) long. Cut it into scant 3/4-inch (18-mm) pieces. Place 1 piece pastry dough, cut side down, in each well of a nonstick 12-cup mini-muffin pan (2-by-5/8-inch [50-by-15-mm] size). If using classic tins, cut the dough into generous 1-inch (25-mm) pieces. Allow the dough pieces to soften several minutes until pliable.

Have a small cup of water nearby. Dip your thumbs in the water, then straight down into the middle of the dough spiral. Flatten it against the bottom of the cup to a thickness of about 1/16 inch (1.5 mm), then smooth the dough up the sides and create a raised lip about 1/8 inch (3 mm) above the pan. The pastry bottoms should be thinner than the tops.

Fill each cup 3/4 full with the cool custard. Bake the pastries until the edges of the dough are frilled and brown, about 8 to 9 minutes for the mini-muffin tins, 15 to 17 minutes for the classic tins.

Remove from the oven and allow the pasteis to cool a few minutes in the pan, then transfer to a rack and cool until just warm. Sprinkle the pasteis generously with confectioners’ sugar, then cinnamon and serve. Repeat with the remaining pastry and custard. These are best consumed the day they’re made.

Recipe Testers' Reviews

According to my Portuguese dad, I can make these pasteis de Nata again and again and again! I am pretty chuffed with how they turned out since I had doubts throughout the entire process of making these traditional tarts. First of all, Pasteis de Nata are the epitome of the classic Portuguese sweet treat. So no pressure!

In following the recipe, when mixing the flour, salt and water in the stand mixer, my dough never achieved the soft pillowy stage I was hoping, or rather thinking, what it would be. My dough did pull away from the sides slightly, but remained sticky, hence I feel I should have added more flour which I didn't at this stage. Doubt started to set-in! When working with the dough on the work surface, I needed to add a very generous amount of flour to stop the dough from sticking. At this stage I probably added so much flour that I actually increased the amount of flour added to the dough significantly.

I found working with the dough a test of extreme patience! I remained calm (yet doubtful) and just kept working with it gently. I was never able to achieve the 18-by-18-inch square, no matter how hard I tried. It was closer to 14 inches. The custard seemed quite thin and even though the recipe mentioned it would be so I had my doubts it would firm up into a creamy custard. While the tarts baked, the butter bubbled and oozed out of the dough and over the edge of the minis tin causing lots of smoke in the extremely hot oven. I baked the minis for 9 minutes and the custard was set and the pastry was golden brown. I expected the custard to have a brown speckled appearance (like the ones you buy commercially), but it remained an eggy yellow. For the larger tins, I baked the tarts for 15 minutes and they too remained an eggy yellow with a golden brown pasty.

To my surprise, the pastry was super flaky and crispy and it had that perfect crackly crunch that is the true mark of a great pasteis de Nata! And the custard? It set and was creamy, sweet, and deliciously perfect.

When my Portuguese mom said they tasted just like the pasteis de Belem (the most famous and original Portuguese Custard Tarts), then I knew we had a winner! Talk about the best compliment ever! It was quite a bit of work to produce these little gems, but the end result was definitely worth the effort!

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Gemma’s Pro Chef Tips For Making Portuguese Custard Tarts

  • Make this recipe with my homemade puff pastry make this recipe even easy by using store-bought puff pastry.
  • Make the custard the day before and pop it in the fridge. Then, bake them off fresh the next day.
  • Don’t be shy with the vanilla extract! It gives your custard a lovely flavor.
  • If you aren’t getting that delicious burnt top, don’t worry! Put the tarts under the broiler for a few seconds to get that iconic egg custard burnt top.
  • Use whole milk for this custard! More fat means more flavor!

Portuguese Custard Tarts vs. Macau Egg Tarts

I’m using the terms Portuguese Custard Tarts and Macau Egg Tarts interchangeably, but there are some subtle differences. Portuguese Custard Tarts ( pasteis de nata or pastel de nata ) are sweeter, less eggy, and sometimes dusted with cinnamon.

The pastry is also slightly different from what you might find in Macau, These are also both different from Hong Kong Egg Tarts , which have a glassy rather than scorched surface, and often a more shortbread-like crust.

To pull off these Macau Egg Tarts, we used our own homemade rough puff pastry and custard filling that tasted just as decadent as the tarts we enjoyed in Macau. I have to say, there was a lot of experimentation involved in this recipe, but we’ve ironed out the details to help you get perfect results.

So treat yourself, make these Portuguese Custard Tarts at home, and take a mini trip to Macau in your kitchen.


Portuguese Quail Egg Custard Tarts

Take a culinary trip around the world without leaving the comfort of your kitchen with these delicious Portuguese quail egg custard tarts. Go ahead and indulge in the international cuisine with this golden dessert that’s bound to become one of your favorites!

They work great as an afternoon treat for those of you who like to sweeten up in between meals. You can also serve them at a dinner party! Be prepared to share this unique quail egg recipe because everyone will ask for it!

HOW TO MAKE PORTUGUESE QUAIL EGG CUSTARD TARTS

Before I take you through the steps, I have to warn you: These tartlets are not at all diet-friendly! If you’re committed to losing weight or simply want to cut out the sugar from your diet, try this keto creme brulee instead – it’s great on any diet, not just keto.

Use the highest quality, full-fat butter you can find. Otherwise, your dough won’t be as it should. My personal recommendation is to make the dough one day ahead, so you can chill it overnight.

I use an egg separator spoon to separate the yolks from the whites. Because of their small size, you can easily work with 2-3 quail eggs at the same time and be done with this in less than 5 minutes.


  • For the shell, I &ldquocheated&rdquo with a pack of off-the-shelf Betty Crocker Pie Crust Mix. You can also use Pillsbury frozen and rolled pie crust.
  • The instant pie crust mix does not disappoint. The crust was so flaky and the texture was so light. If you don&rsquot like your tarts too sweet, you can reduce the sugar a little bit.
  • Be sure to use jumbo-size eggs or you might be short of the filling mixture for this recipe

What is the difference between Portuguese egg tart and egg tart?

Portuguese egg tarts usually only use egg yolks and heavy cream. Egg tarts on the other hand usually call for evaporated milk and whole eggs.

Should I refrigerate egg tarts?

If consuming within the day you make them, you do not need to refrigerate them. You can eat them warm, room temperature, or cold. However, if you plan to eat them the next day, make sure to refrigerate them. You can always reheat them in the toaster oven the next day for about 10 minutes.


The origin of a Portuguese favorite

Remember those laundry-washing monks we mentioned earlier? Let’s go back to them for a second.

Said monks lived at the Jerónimos Monastery in Belém, a seaside neighborhood west of central Lisbon. It was common for them to use egg whites to starch their clothes when washing them, but they soon realized that they had a lot of leftover yolks to deal with.

So the monks did what most people had been doing with egg yolks in Portugal for ages: used them in baked goods. Soon, the first pastéis de nata were born.

The famous Jerónimos Monastery, where pastéis de nata originated. Photo credit: Sandra Henriques Gajjar

In 1820, the Liberal Revolution in Portugal cut off funding to religious institutions. In order to raise money to keep the monastery afloat, the monks began selling their pastries, which before long became a hit.

However, it wasn’t enough, and the monastery ended up closing anyway. When closing up shop, the monks sold their Portuguese custard tarts recipe to the local sugar refinery and called it a day.

Knowing that they had a winner on their hands, the owners of the sugar refinery opened their own bakery just down the street from the old monastery. The bakery is still there today, and if you’ve visited Lisbon, you may have even been there: the original Pastéis de Belém.

Pastéis de Belém: home of the original custard tart recipe. Photo credit: Dave Collier

Portuguese Egg Tarts

Portuguese Egg Tarts are a favorite item to order at Dim Sum Restaurants. If you'll like to bake them yourself, here is the RECIPE.

Total Time | 6 hr 50 mins

Prep Time | 2 hr + 4 hr resting time

Cook Time | 50 mins

Yields : 8 tarts (6 cm/ 2 inch tart mould)

Ingredients

63 ml (4 1/4 tbsp) whipping cream

63 g (4 1/4 tbsp) egg yolk [1 egg yolk is about 12 to 15 g/1 tbsp]

For the flaky pastry:

170 g (3/4 cup) cold butter/margarine

Method

01 In a bowl, stir all the ingredients for the custard together using a spatula. Do not beat and do not use a mixer. Mix well till sugar dissolves. Sieve the egg mixture into a jug.

Rest the mixture in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours.

02 Prepare the oil dough first. In a bowl, cut the butter into the flour using a pastry cutter or a knife to form an oil dough. Flatten into a square in between 2 sheets of cling film. Refrigerate for at least 30 mins.

03 Next, prepare the water dough. In a bowl, mix egg and water into the flour to form a water dough. Add more flour if the dough is too soft.

Flatten into a square in between 2 sheets of cling film. Refrigerate for at least 30 mins.

04 To make the flaky pastry

Flour your work surface. Remove the water dough from the fridge. Roll into a rectangle that is double the size of the oil dough. Place the oil dough square on top of the rolled water dough. Fold the excess water dough on top of the oil dough. Now, the oil dough is sandwiched in between the water dough.

Roll this into a rectangle shape again. Fold the dough into half. Repeat rolling into rectangle and folding the dough 3 more times. When done, refrigerate the puff pastry dough for 30 mins before using.

05 To assemble the tart

Flour your work surface. Roll your puff pastry dough to 5 mm thickness. Cut discs with a round cutter that is slightly larger than your tart mould. Place the discs onto your tart mould. Refrigerate for 15 mins before filling with the custard.

When the custard has rested for 4 hours, fill up your prepared tart shell with the custard. Fill up to 75% full.

Bake in a preheated oven of 200 C/390 F for 40 - 50 mins. The tarts are done when the top is slightly charred.

Notes

You can cut down the workload and prep time by using store bought puff pastry. The tarts will still taste delicious!

If using store bought frozen pastry, defrost in the chiller until softened. Cut round disks slightly larger than your tart mould. Place disks onto tart mould. Refrigerate until firm, about 20 mins. Prick holes all over with a fork before filling with the egg custard. Fill up to 75% full.
Bake in a preheated oven of 220 C/430 F for up to 40 mins or until golden brown and the custard is slightly charred.