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Grilled Corn and Figs with Balsamic Reduction

Grilled Corn and Figs with Balsamic Reduction



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Clean a grill rack very well. If using a gas grill, heat over medium heat. If using a charcoal grill, ignite and spread a bed of coals in a low layer that will cook all the ears of corn over moderate — not searing — heat. (If you can, adjust the height of the rack, too, to avoid burning the corn.)

Put the corn in a big bowl or on a tray, coat with the olive oil, and season with ½ teaspoon of the salt all over. Roll them around and rub them with your hands so they’re well coated.

Lay the ears of corn on the grill, and cook them, turning frequently, until the ears are nicely grill-marked and the kernels are tender, for 7 minutes or more. (Don’t burn them and do shift them around the grill so they cook evenly.) Let cool.

Wipe off the rack, if necessary, and have it hot so the figs don’t stick. Set the fig halves on the rack, cut side down, and cook them only to caramelize the cut side and soften the flesh, for 1 minute or so. Don’t let them burn or get mushy.

With a sharp knife, slice the grilled kernels off the cobs and gather them in a mixing bowl. Put in the fig pieces and toss together with the corn, adding the remaining salt, plus more to taste.

Serve warm or at room temperature in a wide bowl or platter. If you’re drizzling with the balsamic reduction, it’s best (and prettiest) to spread the corn and figs out in a shallow layer on a platter and swirl the vinegar with a teaspoon or fork in thin streaks over the top. This will give every spoonful of corn a delicate accent of sauce.


Grilled corn and figs with balsamic reduction from Lidia's Family Table: More Than 200 Fabulous Recipes to Enjoy Every Day-With Wonderful Ideas for Variations and Improvisations by Lidia Matticchio Bastianich

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  • bay leaves
  • whole cloves
  • corn
  • figs
  • honey
  • balsamic vinegar

Always check the publication for a full list of ingredients. An Eat Your Books index lists the main ingredients and does not include 'store-cupboard ingredients' (salt, pepper, oil, flour, etc.) - unless called for in significant quantity.


Honey Balsamic Roasted Figs Recipe

Sicilian honey roasted figs with vanilla and aged balsamic glaze. Lovely served with goat cheese, perfect as a pastry filling, pizza topping, in a salad, or have them for dessert over whipped ricotta or frozen yogurt.

We came home from Sicily to a loaded fig tree in the back yard, so these to die for roasted figs with honey were begging to be made. I brought a nice big jar of wild Sicilian honey, and this was just the perfect occasion to dive into it.

Pure magic takes place in one pan, everything tossed together and then roasted for about 25 minutes. Once everything mingles together you’ll end up with layers of flavors peeking through at every bite.

All the sweetness from the honey and the figs is perfectly brightened up with notes of lemon and an exotic vanilla undertone.

I even serve these figs as appetizer on mini pizzas with goat cheese and caramelized onions. Sweet and salty never tasted this good.

I’ll save the rest to make a good home-made jam, I might even use this recipe as a base because it is the best ever you guys, no kidding. Hope you try them Pronto!


Recipe Summary

  • 8 skinless, boneless chicken thighs
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 10 fresh figs, stemmed and quartered
  • 1 ½ cups chicken broth
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 large shallot, sliced lengthwise
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary
  • fresh rosemary, for garnish

Pat chicken thighs dry and season both sides with salt and pepper.

Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add chicken thighs and cook, 3 to 4 minutes on each side. Add figs, chicken broth, balsamic vinegar, and shallot. Bring contents to a boil, cover, reduce heat, and let simmer until chicken thighs are no longer pink in the centers and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the centers reads at least 165 degrees F (74 degrees C), about 8 minutes. Transfer thighs to a serving plate and keep warm.

Remove figs from the skillet using a slotted spoon and place them around the chicken on the plate.

Add minced rosemary to the skillet contents, increase heat to medium-high, and allow contents to come to a full boil to create a the reduction. Continue to boil, stirring often, until liquid reduces to approximately 1 cup, 8 to 10 minutes. Drizzle balsamic reduction over chicken and figs and garnish with rosemary sprigs. Serve warm.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 2 teaspoons butter, divided
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, divided
  • 4 firm ripe white peaches (about 1 3/4 pounds), halved and pitted
  • 8 firm ripe Black Mission figs, halved lengthwise (about 1 pound)
  • ⅓ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ⅓ cup crème fraîche
  • ⅛ teaspoon salt

Cook peppercorns in a small skillet over medium heat 6 minutes or until fragrant and toasted. Cool. Place peppercorns in a heavy-duty zip-top plastic bag seal. Crush peppercorns with a meat mallet or rolling pin set aside.

Melt 1 teaspoon butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat stir in 1 teaspoon thyme. Add peaches, cut sides down, to pan. Cook 2 minutes or until browned. Remove from pan. Place 1 peach half, cut sides up, on each of 8 plates. Melt remaining 1 teaspoon butter in pan stir in remaining 1 teaspoon thyme. Add figs, cut sides down, to pan cook 2 minutes or until browned. Place two fig halves on each plate.

Add vinegar to pan cook over medium-low heat until reduced to 3 tablespoons (about 3 minutes). Cool slightly. Spoon about 2 teaspoons crème fraîche into the center of each peach half drizzle about 1 teaspoon vinegar mixture over each serving. Sprinkle each serving with about 1/8 teaspoon pepper. Sprinkle evenly with salt.


Reviews

Made this with fresh figs instead of dried and glad we did. Also added whipped cream, honey and some lemon zest to the mascarpone for extra flavour. Don’t know if I would make again, just wasn’t spectacular.

I made this for the first time a couple of weeks ago for my family and we all loved it. Dinner was beef bourgiougnon and this was the perfect compliment to go after. The flavors followed beautifully after the dinner and yet was still light and full of flavor. I am having 14 dinner guests tomorrow and am making it again to go after a steak dinner.

This is SUPER easy and fast to make. Love it! I hate walnuts so I used almonds instead. This was the only substitute. It was very good and unusual so everyone seemed to appreciate it - even my husband who is not crazy about desserts in general. I think if I did it again, I would put in a little less sugar. I think the quality of your balsamic can affect the sweetness level.

Can't believe more people haven't tried this! I've made it every holiday for last 3 years, and it always gets rave reviews. Even my non-adventurous fam members devour. And I usually offer an option of either Mascarpone or vanilla ice cream. Does not dissapoint.

very successful, rich, complex. can be served as smaller portions recipe suggests.

Incredibly easy and reasonably quick. I brought it to a potluck and it stood out among all the cakes. Not too sweet or starchy.

Great dish. I made it several times. No one would believe me it was balsamic reduction. Everyone thought it was some kind of chocolate. I serve the dish with vanilla ice cream instead of cheese.



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How to prepare this grilled figs prosciutto and burrata appetizer

This is an easy dish to pull together. It takes just a few minutes to grill the figs, which you can do a couple of hours ahead. If you&rsquove never tried fresh grilled figs, they are pretty great, richly caramelized on the outside, fresh and fruity inside.

  • I usually serve this appetizer on a big platter, with small plates, forks and a basket of sliced baguette on the side. This way, everyone, including my gluten-free friends, are taken care of.
  • If you prefer, you can serve this bruschetta-style: arrange arugula, burrata, prosciutto, and figs on baguette slices. Drizzle with olive oil and balsamic. Season with a little salt and pepper.

What kind of prosciutto is best?

I recommend you use high quality prosciutto for this dish. Prosciutto de parma is my favorite. It has a sweet-salty-savory flavor and a buttery texture. If you can get it freshly sliced, ask for extra thin slices.

If you get hooked on burrata and want more recipes, here&rsquos a good one to start with, from Cooking Light: Fettuccine with Seared Tomatoes, Spinach, and Burrata.

Here are a few more delicious Panning The Globe appetizer recipes to try

Here&rsquos the Grilled Figs, Prosciutto and Burrata Appetizer recipe. If you try this recipe I hope you&rsquoll come back to leave a star rating and a comment. I&rsquod love to know what you think!


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You can rate this recipe by giving it a score of one, two, three, or four forks, which will be averaged out with other cooks' ratings. If you like, you can also share your specific comments, positive or negative - as well as any tips or substitutions - in the written review space.

Epicurious Links

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Legal Notice

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved.

Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated as of 1/1/21) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated as of 1/1/21).

The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast.


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